The Good Friday Agreement In Full

Taking into account the policing principles set out in the agreement, the Commission will examine the work of the police in Northern Ireland and present, on the basis of its results, proposals for future police structures and regulations, including the possibility of promoting broad Community support for these schemes. We should all know and understand that we are threatened, that we are seeable, that the agreement we believe we are protecting has not been fully transposed into British law and has never been fully implemented. Twenty years after the signing of the treaty by the British government, the Good Friday Agreement has not been fully implemented. This means that after Brexit we will be deprived of their rights as EU citizens, we will be marginalised and our community will be further divided. Since the 1998 agreement, it has been reported that some significant progress has been made in demobilization and demilitarization: 26 base camps have been either closed or demolished, the number of military patrols has decreased by a third, and more than 3,000 British troops have been demobilized or withdrawn.1 Despite this success, some 2,000 additional British troops have been sent to Northern Ireland, In May/June 1999, the Commission carried out an opinion poll on the understanding of public attitudes towards police work in Northern Ireland. The Commission also visited various locations, including a number of police services in the United Kingdom, South Africa, Spain and the United States. On 9 September 1999, the Northern Ireland Independent Police Commission presented its report and made recommendations on issues relating to human rights, accountability, policing with the Community, police structure, size of the police service, the composition of the police service and other matters. The Commission made 175 recommendations1 Trade union reactions to the report and its recommendations have not been positive.2″Northern Ireland Policy Commission”, BBC News, accessed 29 January 2013, www.bbc.co.uk/northernireland/schools/agreement/policing/commissi. The British Government is practically out of the equation and neither the British Parliament nor the people have, under this agreement, the legal right to hinder the achievement of Irish unity if it had the agreement of the people of the North and the South. Our nation is and will remain a nation of 32 counties.

Antrim and Down are and will remain a part of Ireland, just like any county in the South. [20] The agreement was approved by voters across the island of Ireland in two referendums on 22 May 1998. In Northern Ireland, in 1998, during the referendum on the Good Friday Agreement in Northern Ireland, voters were asked whether they supported the multi-party agreement. In the Republic of Ireland, voters were asked whether they would allow the state to sign the agreement and authorize the necessary constitutional amendments (Nineteenth Amendment to the Constitution of Ireland) to facilitate it. The two lawyers had to approve the agreement for it to enter into force. In a context of political violence during the unrest, the agreement committed participants to “exclusively democratic and peaceful ways to resolve disputes over political issues.” This had two aspects: the power of the sovereign government responsible for it is exercised with strict impartiality on behalf of all, in the diversity of its identities and traditions, and is based on the principles of absolute respect for and equality of civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights, freedom of discrimination for all citizens. and the equal esteem and fair and equitable treatment of the identity, ethics and aspirations of both communities. . . .